pgerror 0.2.1

This Release
pgerror 0.2.1
Date
Status
Stable
Other Releases
Abstract
Tools for better error handling
Description
Includes error_data, a type for passing error details around, and a try function that will return error details to the caller
Released By
decibel
License
The MIT (X11) License
Resources
Special Files
Tags

Extensions

pgerror 0.2.1
Tools for better error handling

README

Examples

SQL
CREATE SCHEMA error;
CREATE EXTENSION pgerror WITH SCHEMA error;

CREATE TABLE error_log(
error_time timestamptz NOT NULL DEFAULT now()
, error_data error.error_data NOT NULL
);
CREATE TABLE
INSERT INTO error_log(error_data) SELECT error FROM error.try('SELECT 1') WHERE error IS NOT NULL;
INSERT 0 0
INSERT INTO error_log(error_data) SELECT error FROM error.try('SELECT bad') WHERE error IS NOT NULL;
INSERT 0 1
\x
Expanded display is on.
SELECT error_time, (error_data).* FROM error_log;
-[ RECORD 1 ]---+--------------------------------------------------------------
error_time      | 2016-08-11 18:50:24.105764-05
sqlstate        | 42703
message         | column "bad" does not exist
hint            |
detail          |
context         | PL/pgSQL function error.try(text) line 3 at EXECUTE statement
schema_name     |
table_name      |
column_name     |
constraint_name |
type_name       |
\x
SELECT error.raise(error_data, 'WARNING') FROM error_log;
WARNING:  column "bad" does not exist
CONTEXT:  SQL statement "SELECT pg_temp.raise_error_internal()"
PL/pgSQL function raise(text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text) line 47 at PERFORM
SQL function "raise" statement 1
 raise
-------

(1 row)
SELECT error.raise(message := 'something bad', detail := 'Something bad happened!', hint := $$Don't do that!$$);
ERROR:  something bad
DETAIL:  Something bad happened!
HINT:  Don't do that!
CONTEXT:  SQL statement "SELECT pg_temp.raise_error_internal()"
PL/pgSQL function raise(text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text,text) line 47 at PERFORM

INCOMPATIBILITIES

Some of the fields in the error_data type have different names than those used in the PLPGSQL RAISE command. This was done because the PLPGSQL names are reserved words, which makes referring to them difficult.

error_data

This is a compound type that can be passed around or stored in a table. It contains fields that correspond to every available detail for an exception.

error_data()

Convenience function for constructing an error_data type. Note that it intentionally defaults all the fields to an empty string ('') instead of NULL. This matches the behavior of what PLPGSQL’s GET DIAGNOSTICS does.

raise()

These functions will raise the specified error. You may pass in either individual fields or an error_data type. Any fields that are NULL or an empty string ('') are not added to the RAISE command and will not appear in the output.

Note
Unlike PLPGSQL, these functions treat an empty string ('') and NULL the same. This means it’s not possible to add an empty string to an exception.

try()

This function will execute the SQL in the code parameter and return the number of rows affected (NULL on an error), or an error_data record if an error occurred (NULL if no error).

try_cursor()

Similar to try(), except query is opened as a cursor, and a reference to that cursor is returned in result. If cursor_name isn’t specified an un-named cursor is created.

try_into()

Similar to try(), except code is executed using EXECUTE INTO and the result is returned via result. You must pass an appropriate data type to result, but it can be just a NULL, ie: NULL::int. If strict is set to TRUE, the STRICT option to EXECUTE INTO is used.

Copyright and License

pgerror is released under a MIT liscense.

Copyright (c) 2016 Jim Nasby <Jim.Nasby@BlueTreble.com>.